Pregnancy Support

Dr. Charelle E. C. Lockhart was born here in Nassau Bahamas. She is a graduate of the class of 1994 at St. Andrew’s School. With honors, Charelle obtained her Bachelors of Science Degree in 1998 from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. She then completed her Bachelor in Medicine and Surgery (MBBS) at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago in 2003 and in 2010 completed her residency in pediatrics at Jackson memorial Hospital in Miami Florida. She was selected by her program director to be chief resident and served in that capacity from 2010 to 2011.  She has mentored a group of residents from Princess Margaret Hospital who are now all currently in pediatric residency programs across the US. Charelle works both in the public and private sectors of medicine here in Nassau and firmly believes that young physicians coming home armed with knowledge and experience...

Source: Medela For the first few days after giving birth, breasts remain soft and produce colostrum, the first milk. Colostrum comes in many colors and the amounts may seem small, but it is produced in just the right amount. The amounts may seem small, but colostrum is available in just the right amount for the size of your baby’s stomach. Colostrum is rich in nutrients and immune factors which feed your newborn baby and protect him from diseases. Within 72-96 hours, you will notice changes in your breasts. They will become full, firm, warm, and perhaps tender as milk production increases and colostrum begins to change to mature milk. Breast fullness and mild to moderate swelling is normal. It is caused by milk and extra blood and fluid in the breasts. Your body will use the extra fluids to make milk for your baby. This breast fullness and swelling may last a day...

Although most breastfeeding mothers choose to stop at some point in the baby’s first year of life, others continue for longer, sometimes in to toddler and school age. Prolonged breast feeding beyond 2 years old is controversial in the western world but it is strongly advocated by some women’s groups who feel it should be the child’s choice when to stop. No matter how long a woman decides to breast feed, it is a personal choice and there are benefits for the child immediately and for the years ahead. There is no evidence to suggest that prolonged breastfeeding into childhood is harmful to the child’s physical or psychological wellbeing, provided they are happy and comfortable continuing to do so. Some mother’s are made to feel uncomfortable by family or friends who think it is strange to breastfeed an older baby or toddler. These women often decide to breastfeed in private...